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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Prince Rupert Library JP CARR (Text) 33294000180588 Juvenile Picture Books Volume hold Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780810911505 :
  • ISBN: 0810911507 :
  • Physical Description: 1 v. : chiefly col. ill. ; 30 cm.
  • Publisher: New York : H.N. Abrams, 1989, c1987.

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.:
The illustrations set the classic nonsense poem ... Read More
Subject: Children's poetry, English
Nonsense verses

  • Horn Book Guide Reviews : Horn Book Guide Reviews 1996
    Base's picture-book version of Carroll's ""Jabberwocky"" has been reissued as a series of three-dimensional ""dioramas."" While the illustrations lend themselves to this treatment and the execution is impressive, the book should be opened to a ninety-degree angle for proper viewing of each page. This poor mechanical design makes the book difficult for younger children to appreciate. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews
  • Publishers Weekly Reviews : PW Reviews 1989 May #3
    Base's considerable interpretive talents, on full display in Animalia , are featured in this wildly inventive version of ``Jabberwocky'' from Through the Looking Glass. The lilting phonetic texture of the poem is perfectly enhanced by Base's dramatic full-color paintings. The primeval forest, fairly bursting from the pages with steamy vegetation of every description, is a fitting home for the variety of incredible creatures that dwell within. Jabberwock, Jubjub and Bandersnatch are fully and uniquely hewn from the artist's imagination. ``Slithy Toves'' becomes two endearing little green creatures that look like a cross between prehistoric animals and beings recently arrived from another planet. The warring elements of this fantastic adventure are dichotomously conveyed: bleary-eyed, razor-toothed, with sharp tentacles, the Jabberwock swoops menacingly, a true embodiment of villainous horror, while the fair-haired prince, thoughtful and courageous on his milk-white steed, is by contrast good and pure. Overflowing with mythic splendor, this compelling version of the Jabberwocky should prove enduring. All ages. (May) Copyright 1989 Cahners Business Information.
  • Publishers Weekly Reviews : PW Reviews 1996 March #1
    Graeme Base's 1989 version of Lewis Carroll's famous poem achieves new depths in Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky: A Book of Brillig Dioramas. Each spread now pops out in a multi-layer, 3-D, stage-like setting. (Abrams, $19.95 14p all ages ISBN 0-8109-3520-1 Apr.) Copyright 1996 Cahners Business Information.
  • School Library Journal Reviews : SLJ Reviews 1989 August
    Gr 1-4-- The creator of Animalia here applies his far-out fantasy style to Lewis Carroll's ``narrative'' nonsense poem. A princely hero sets out from his castle to slay the Jabberwock. Scenes of a cozy medieval village and a romantic landscape are abruptly breached by the advent of the Jabberwock, a hideous apparition loosely based on Tenniel's original. The double-page confrontation, as readers peer into its lurid, gaping throat, is nightmarish, but the hero swiftly dispatches the monster and rides home. The village is now inexplicably in ruins, while the king on his throne appears unchanged. This discrepancy will probably interest children less than the small anachronisms scattered throughout the illustrations, or the sub-Martian fauna lurking in the riotous flora. (These biological oddities are a lot more convincing than the illustrations of the horse, tack, or rider, in which the artist seems to have been more intent on imagination than observation.) Less inventive and visually aggressive than Animalia , Jabberwocky' s heroic-psychedelic interpretation may not be definitive but will introduce Carroll's classic to new readers. --Patricia Dooley, Univ . of Washington, Seattle Copyright 1989 Cahners Business Information.
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