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  • 1 of 1 copy available at BC Interlibrary Connect. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Prince Rupert Library.

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0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Prince Rupert Library Finc (Text) 33294002080299 Adult Fiction - Second Floor Volume hold Reshelving -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781250312204
  • ISBN: 1250312205
  • ISBN: 9781250312228
  • Physical Description: print
    292 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Minotaur Books, [2020]

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.: "From bestselling author Charles Finch comes the third and final in a prequel trilogy to his lauded Charles Lenox series. London, 1855: A young and eager Charles Lenox faces his toughest case yet: a murder without a single clue. Slumped in a first-class car at Paddington Station is the body of a young, handsome gentleman. He has no luggage, empty pockets, and no sign of violence upon his person - yet Lenox knows instantly that it's not a natural death. Pursuing the investigation against the wishes of Scotland Yard, the detective encounters every obstacle London in 1855 has to offer, from obstinate royalty to class prejudice to the intense grief of his closest friend. Written in Charles Finch's unmistakably warm, witty, and winning voice, The Last Passenger is a cunning and deeply satisfying conclusion to the journey begun in The Woman in the Water and The Vanishing Man"--
Subject: Lenox, Charles (Fictitious character) -- Fiction
Private investigators -- England -- London -- Fiction
Murder -- Investigation -- Fiction
Genre/Form: Mystery fiction.
Detective and mystery fiction.
Historical fiction.

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2020 January #1
    A man is found brutally murdered on a train, with every clue to his identity removed, down to the tags on his clothing, cut from the bleeding body. So opens the latest title in Finch's long-running Victorian-era mystery series featuring gentleman detective Charles Lenox, the third in a trilogy detailing earlier cases before his reputation and skills were firmly established. Set 10 years before series debut A Beautiful Blue Death (2007), this tightly plotted mystery, winding through the back alleys of Whitechapel to the halls of Parliament itself, is rich in historical detail and quite enjoyable on its own merits but will be of particular interest to fans of the series, as it provides useful backstory to favorite characters. Lenox, quick-witted, fair-minded but still fallible, is an extremely likable protagonist who is drawn to his somewhat unusual profession out of a genuine wish to help others—even against the whispers of society and at some personal cost. His coming into his own as a detective is a delight. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2020 January #1
    A man is found brutally murdered on a train, with every clue to his identity removed, down to the tags on his clothing, cut from the bleeding body. So opens the latest title in Finch's long-running Victorian-era mystery series featuring gentleman detective Charles Lenox, the third in a trilogy detailing earlier cases before his reputation and skills were firmly established. Set 10 years before series debut A Beautiful Blue Death (2007), this tightly plotted mystery, winding through the back alleys of Whitechapel to the halls of Parliament itself, is rich in historical detail and quite enjoyable on its own merits but will be of particular interest to fans of the series, as it provides useful backstory to favorite characters. Lenox, quick-witted, fair-minded but still fallible, is an extremely likable protagonist who is drawn to his somewhat unusual profession out of a genuine wish to help others—even against the whispers of society and at some personal cost. His coming into his own as a detective is a delight. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.
  • BookPage Reviews : BookPage Reviews 2020 March
    Whodunit: March 2020

    Rural noir, historical horrors and a tense courtroom drama are featured in this month's best new mysteries.

    The Deep

    The “unsinkable” Titanic has engendered story upon story. What is less known is that the Titanic had a sister ship, the Britannic, that outlived its sibling by only four years. Alma Katsu’s latest thriller, The Deep, weaves together narratives of the two doomed luxury liners through the experiences of Annie Hebbley, who sailed on them both. Annie served as a maid/stewardess on the Titanic in 1912, then as a nurse on the Britannic in 1916 after it was converted into a wartime hospital ship. In between postings, she spent several years in an asylum and at first, Annie remembers almost nothing of the iceberg crash she experienced on the Titanic, or its aftermath. But then her memories of seemingly paranormal experiences on the doomed ship start to return. She is not unlike Jack Nicholson’s character in The Shining, a none-too-together person who’s drawn toward the occult somewhat against her will. The reader will wonder whether the evidence of the supernatural are just figments of Annie’s imagination or something more sinister. And even though you know what will happen—these ships are gonna go down—it does not diminish the eerie suspense one iota.

    The Holdout

    Los Angeles, 2009: A jury remains deadlocked in the trial of African American teacher Bobby Nock, accused of murdering 15-year-old student Jessica Silver. The evidence is pretty overwhelming, and 11 jurors agree on a guilty verdict, but Maya Seale, juror number 12, disagrees. One by one, the other jurors come around to her way of thinking, and Bobby is acquitted. In the second story arc of Graham Moore’s gripping legal thriller The Holdout, we fast forward to 2019, by which time several jurors have expressed their reservations about Nock’s acquittal. The 10-year anniversary of the crime occasions a TV documentary on the alleged murderer, the trial and the jurors. One juror in particular, Rick Leonard, strongly regrets his acquittal vote and embarks on a mission to find the evidence that will prove Bobby guilty. He doesn’t get far into his quest before he is murdered—in Maya’s hotel room. While the earlier crime drama is revisited on network TV, a rather more pressing contemporary crime drama unfolds as Maya attempts to prove her innocence. Have your page-turning fingers limbered up, because The Holdout will give them a workout.

    The Last Passenger

    After establishing PI Charles Lenox in about a dozen mystery novels, author Charles Finch penned a prequel series chronicling the early adventures of the detective. The third and final installment, The Last Passenger, takes place in 1855 London, where a dead body has been found in a train car in Paddington Station. The victim has the look of a member of the gentry, but every piece of evidence that could lead to his identification has been painstakingly removed. As often happens in mysteries, an overworked and plodding policeman enlists the help of the urbane PI in solving the crime, and the PI develops an entirely different take on the situation. Finch’s plotting is excellent, his characters well developed, but it is his prose that truly shines. He evokes the writing style of 19th-century English authors—Wilkie Collins jumps to mind—lending a degree of authenticity to the narrative found in comparatively few historical novels. Finch also incorporates then-contemporary international politics, especially the burgeoning abolitionist movement in the U.S., in this exceptional and atmospheric mystery.

    ★ The Bramble and the Rose

    Rural noir has roots dating back at least to James M. Cain, and writers such as James Lee Burke, C.J. Box and Attica Locke carry on the tradition today, exposing readers to the dark side of country life (and death). Tom Bouman, a relative newcomer to the scene, scored big with his 2014 debut, Dry Bones in the Valley, which won the prestigious Edgar Award for best first novel that year. His latest, The Bramble and the Rose, is third in the series featuring small-town cop Henry Farrell. Henry’s town, Wild Thyme, Pennsylvania, has indeed provided a wild time for retired PI Carl Dentry, and not in a good way. His decapitated body has been discovered in some nearby woods, the severed head secreted in the hollow of a tree. When Henry’s ex is murdered before she can tell him something she knows about Dentry’s murder, Henry finds himself the main suspect in the case. And as he delves further into the growing number of mysteries that plague his small town, he becomes not only the chief suspect but also the target of person or persons unknown. There is a free-form stream-of-consciousness element to Henry’s first-person narration that is very appealing—world-weary yet cautiously optimistic.

    Copyright 2020 BookPage Reviews.
  • Kirkus Reviews : Kirkus Reviews 2020 January #2
    When a violent murder scene yields no obvious evidence, private detective Charles Lenox must solve one of his most complex cases yet. In this third prequel to the series (The Vanishing Man, 2019, etc.), Lenox is deep in a chess match with Lord Deere, neighbor and husband to close friend Lady Jane, when Inspector Hemstock from Scotland Yard knocks on his door with news of a murder. Lenox arrives at Paddington Station soon after and meets Joseph Stanley, the stationmaster on duty, as well as the conductor of the train where the body was found. When searching the victim's pockets reveals no form of identification, Lenox discovers that the only real clue is the lack of evidence: The murderer has gone so far as to remove the label from the victim's suit jacket. Commissioner Sir Richard Mayne gives Lenox permission to assist with the case—an unpopular decision with most of the force. Eager to prove his value, Lenox and his butler, Graham, go in search of passengers on the train from Manchester to London and scan the papers for word of a missing person. While the Yard suspects gang involvement linked to Manc hester, Lenox's investigation places this murder on a global scale when the first person connected to the victim turns out to be American. Politics across the pond are at a boiling point, with the Abolitionist movement gaining strength and whispers of civil war growing louder by the day. The commentary around this is sobering, as it seems so far-fetched to Lenox that civil war could be a possibility, and yet....As the private detective continues to contemplate motive, he's often distracted by Lady Jane's attempts to find him a suitable match and end his reign as most-eligible bachelor. This subplot almost takes the spotlight away from the mystery while it provides satisfying backstory for key relationships in the series. Avid mystery readers will enjoy Lenox's thorough review of his sleuthing process, not in the sense of "this is how I solved this" but rather "this is how I could have done better." Overall, a bit more history than mystery. Choose this if you revel in atmosphere. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.
  • Kirkus Reviews : Kirkus Reviews 2020 January #2
    When a violent murder scene yields no obvious evidence, private detective Charles Lenox must solve one of his most complex cases yet. In this third prequel to the series (The Vanishing Man, 2019, etc.), Lenox is deep in a chess match with Lord Deere, neighbor and husband to close friend Lady Jane, when Inspector Hemstock from Scotland Yard knocks on his door with news of a murder. Lenox arrives at Paddington Station soon after and meets Joseph Stanley, the stationmaster on duty, as well as the conductor of the train where the body was found. When searching the victim's pockets reveals no form of identification, Lenox discovers that the only real clue is the lack of evidence: The murderer has gone so far as to remove the label from the victim's suit jacket. Commissioner Sir Richard Mayne gives Lenox permission to assist with the case—an unpopular decision with most of the force. Eager to prove his value, Lenox and his butler, Graham, go in search of passengers on the train from Manchester to London and scan the papers for word of a missing person. While the Yard suspects gang involvement linked to Manc hester, Lenox's investigation places this murder on a global scale when the first person connected to the victim turns out to be American. Politics across the pond are at a boiling point, with the Abolitionist movement gaining strength and whispers of civil war growing louder by the day. The commentary around this is sobering, as it seems so far-fetched to Lenox that civil war could be a possibility, and yet....As the private detective continues to contemplate motive, he's often distracted by Lady Jane's attempts to find him a suitable match and end his reign as most-eligible bachelor. This subplot almost takes the spotlight away from the mystery while it provides satisfying backstory for key relationships in the series. Avid mystery readers will enjoy Lenox's thorough review of his sleuthing process, not in the sense of "this is how I solved this" but rather "this is how I could have done better." Overall, a bit more history than mystery. Choose this if you revel in atmosphere. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.
  • Library Journal Reviews : LJ Reviews 2019 September

    In this wrap-up to Finch's prequel trilogy to his best-selling Victorian-era series, novice detective Charles Lenox is stumped. A handsome young man has been found dead in a first-class car at Paddington Station, lacking luggage, identification, and any signs of violence. Charles just knows it's no natural death.

    Copyright 2019 Library Journal.
  • Publishers Weekly Reviews : PW Reviews 2019 December #2

    Set in 1855 London, Finch's solid 13th Charles Lenox mystery (after 2019's The Vanishing Man) takes the aristocratic sleuth to a crime scene at Paddington Station, where a conductor on the train from Manchester has found a man's bloody corpse. The killer insured that identifying his victim would be a tall order by not only emptying the dead man's pockets but also taking the time to cut out all the labels from the man's clothing. While the police attribute the killing to an ongoing gang war in Manchester, Lenox pursues a different tack after realizing that the conductor lied about missing a bus ticket home in his statement to the authorities. Other evidence, such as the conductor's not wearing a uniform, suggests that he was an imposter not employed by the railway. Finch effectively integrates the politics of the time, including pre–Civil War tensions in America, and his insertion of subplots regarding his lead's romantic life doesn't distract from the clever murder puzzle. Anne Perry and David Dickinson fans will be satisfied. 100,000-copy announced first printing; author tour. Agent: Elizabeth Weed, Book Group. (Feb.)

    Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

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