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  • 0 of 1 copy available at BC Interlibrary Connect. (Show)
  • 0 of 1 copy available at Prince Rupert Library.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Prince Rupert Library Arms (Text) 33294002080224 Adult Fiction - Second Floor Volume hold Checked out 2021-02-09

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781250254283
  • ISBN: 1250254280
  • Physical Description: print
    356 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Minotaur Books, [2020]

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.: "In #1 New York Times bestseller Kelley Armstrong's latest thriller, the hidden town of Rockton is about to face a challenge none of them saw coming: a baby. Every season in Rockton seems to bring a new challenge. At least that's what Detective Casey Duncan has felt since she decided to call this place home. Between all the secretive residents, the sometimes-hostile settlers outside, and the surrounding wilderness, there's always something to worry about. While on a much needed camping vacation with her boyfriend, Sheriff Eric Dalton, Casey hears a baby crying in the woods. The sound leads them to a tragic scene: a woman buried under the snow, murdered, a baby still alive in her arms. A town that doesn't let anyone in under the age of eighteen, Rockton must take care of its youngest resident yet while solving another murder and finding out where the baby came from - and whether she's better off where she is. #1 New York Times bestselling author Kelley Armstrong again delivers an engaging, tense thriller set in perhaps the most interesting town in all of contemporary crime fiction"--
Subject: Murder -- Investigation -- Fiction
Infants -- Fiction
City and town life -- Canada -- Fiction
Fugitives from justice -- Fiction
Wilderness areas -- Fiction
Canada -- Fiction
Genre/Form: Suspense fiction.
Mystery fiction.
Thrillers (Fiction)
Detective and mystery fiction.

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2019 December #1
    In Armstrong's latest in her series set in the remote town of Rockton (where people go to forget their past), Detective Casey Duncan is taking a little vacation with Eric Dalton, her boyfriend and the sheriff of Rockton, when she discovers a murdered woman whose body holds her still-living baby. Who is the dead woman? Was someone in Rockton responsible for her death? The fifth Rockton novel (following Watcher in the Woods, 2019) builds on the previous four, opening up the town a little more, revealing more of its mysteries and more of its residents' hidden secrets. The prolific Armstrong is an adept storyteller (she's writes horror and fantasy as well as mysteries, for both adults and teens) who makes the rather out-there idea of a small, protected community full of people with things to hide seem not only plausible but entirely believable. Fans of the author who have not yet checked out the Rockton novels should do so, pronto. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.
  • BookPage Reviews : BookPage Reviews 2020 February
    Whodunit: February 2020

    February's hottest mystery releases include the latest historical from mother-son writing duo Charles Todd, bestselling British writer Sophie Hannah and more.


    ★ A Divided Loyalty

    Scotland Yard Detective Inspector Ian Rutledge, the central character of the wildly popular series by mother-and-son writing duo Charles Todd, embarks on his 22nd adventure in A Divided Loyalty. A murder victim has been discovered in the center of a stone circle. Another officer was originally assigned to investigate, but Rutledge is deployed to reopen the case after he successfully completes a separate investigation displaying some similarities to the stone-circle murder. The deeper Rutledge becomes involved in the investigation, the more likely it looks that a fellow officer was the perpetrator. Rutledge finds this troubling not only from a public relations perspective but also because he respects and likes the officer in question. But the evidence is damning and proceeds to become more so with each passing day. Rutledge is one of the most complicated and finely drawn characters in contemporary crime fiction. Suffering from shell shock after his experiences in World War I, he carries on regular conversations with a dead soldier from his command, a man who disobeyed orders while under fire and was executed by Rutledge for his disobedience. There’s not a weak episode to be found in Todd’s terrific series.


    Sign up for our mystery newsletter!


    Perfect Little Children

    Picture this: You haven’t seen your friend Flora in a dozen years, nor her husband, Lewis, nor their kids, Emily and Thomas. Then, almost as if by accident, you see her step out of her silver Range Rover, and she looks exactly the same, no sign of aging whatsoever. OK, that could happen. Diet, exercise, perhaps a little nip-and-tuck surgery—those could do the trick. But then her kids step out of the car as well, and you overhear Flora speak to them: “Oh, well done, Emily. That’s kind. Say thank you, Thomas.” But the thing is, Emily and Thomas should be teenagers by now, and these children are preschoolers. This is the situation faced by Beth Leeson in Sophie Hannah’s latest thriller, Perfect Little Children, and she cannot wrap her mind around it. So she does what any red-blooded suspense heroine would do—she noses around a bit. And then a bit more. And with each new piece of information she acquires, she becomes more convinced that there is a crime to be uncovered, and that her former friend may be in mortal danger. This notion begins to border on obsession, and the reader gets to watch as it becomes more and more deeply rooted. So what on earth is going on? Genetic age manipulation? Some strange, dark mind game? Or is Beth simply losing her marbles, one by one? Whatever the case, this is another satisfying psycho-thriller from the queen of the genre.

    Alone in the Wild

    Kelley Armstrong’s Rockton series continues in Alone in the Wild. Deep in the Yukon Mountains, the totally off-the-grid town of Rockton is a perfect escape for criminals and battered spouses alike. After being accepted by the council and paying a hefty fee, new residents say goodbye to any communication (electronic or otherwise) with the outside world. There’s only one firm rule in place: no townspeople under the age of 18. So when Detective Casey Duncan and her partner in both work and romance, Eric Dalton, stumble upon a murdered woman holding a barely alive baby, they feel no small measure of consternation about what to do with the child while launching an investigation into the murder. The denizens of Rockton are a motley crew and certainly not the preferred cross-section of society to be engaged in childcare. Armstrong has created a unique milieu for setting her suspense novels, which is no easy task nowadays. Read one, and you will want to read the rest.

    The Good Killer

    If you’re up for a first-rate page turner, look no further than Harry Dolan’s The Good Killer. Iraq vet Sean and his partner, Molly, have been living under the radar for years, harboring a virtually priceless secret and trying to remain invisible to a pair of dangerous enemies. Then, by sheer unfortunate happenstance, Sean uses his military training to take down a spree killer in a Houston mall. Sean makes a fairly clean getaway, but his face and license plate number are captured by mall security cams, and he becomes something of a reluctant celebrity. Meanwhile, Molly is attending a yoga seminar in Montana, where she is required to surrender her cell phone and renounce all contact with the outside world. Sean has no choice but to drive there and collect her before anyone else can. He heads north in an aging Camry with a faulty alternator, woefully under-armored vis-à-vis the opposing teams. The rest of the book is basically one long and harrowing chase scene, right up to the explosive climax. Block out sufficient time to read The Good Killer in one sitting. It’ll be hard to stop once you get started.

    Copyright 2020 BookPage Reviews.
  • BookPage Reviews : BookPage Reviews 2020 February
    Whodunit: February 2020

    February's hottest mystery releases include the latest historical from mother-son writing duo Charles Todd, bestselling British writer Sophie Hannah and more.


    ★ A Divided Loyalty

    Scotland Yard Detective Inspector Ian Rutledge, the central character of the wildly popular series by mother-and-son writing duo Charles Todd, embarks on his 22nd adventure in A Divided Loyalty. A murder victim has been discovered in the center of a stone circle. Another officer was originally assigned to investigate, but Rutledge is deployed to reopen the case after he successfully completes a separate investigation displaying some similarities to the stone-circle murder. The deeper Rutledge becomes involved in the investigation, the more likely it looks that a fellow officer was the perpetrator. Rutledge finds this troubling not only from a public relations perspective but also because he respects and likes the officer in question. But the evidence is damning and proceeds to become more so with each passing day. Rutledge is one of the most complicated and finely drawn characters in contemporary crime fiction. Suffering from shell shock after his experiences in World War I, he carries on regular conversations with a dead soldier from his command, a man who disobeyed orders while under fire and was executed by Rutledge for his disobedience. There’s not a weak episode to be found in Todd’s terrific series.


    Sign up for our mystery newsletter!


    Perfect Little Children

    Picture this: You haven’t seen your friend Flora in a dozen years, nor her husband, Lewis, nor their kids, Emily and Thomas. Then, almost as if by accident, you see her step out of her silver Range Rover, and she looks exactly the same, no sign of aging whatsoever. OK, that could happen. Diet, exercise, perhaps a little nip-and-tuck surgery—those could do the trick. But then her kids step out of the car as well, and you overhear Flora speak to them: “Oh, well done, Emily. That’s kind. Say thank you, Thomas.” But the thing is, Emily and Thomas should be teenagers by now, and these children are preschoolers. This is the situation faced by Beth Leeson in Sophie Hannah’s latest thriller, Perfect Little Children, and she cannot wrap her mind around it. So she does what any red-blooded suspense heroine would do—she noses around a bit. And then a bit more. And with each new piece of information she acquires, she becomes more convinced that there is a crime to be uncovered, and that her former friend may be in mortal danger. This notion begins to border on obsession, and the reader gets to watch as it becomes more and more deeply rooted. So what on earth is going on? Genetic age manipulation? Some strange, dark mind game? Or is Beth simply losing her marbles, one by one? Whatever the case, this is another satisfying psycho-thriller from the queen of the genre.

    Alone in the Wild

    Kelley Armstrong’s Rockton series continues in Alone in the Wild. Deep in the Yukon Mountains, the totally off-the-grid town of Rockton is a perfect escape for criminals and battered spouses alike. After being accepted by the council and paying a hefty fee, new residents say goodbye to any communication (electronic or otherwise) with the outside world. There’s only one firm rule in place: no townspeople under the age of 18. So when Detective Casey Duncan and her partner in both work and romance, Eric Dalton, stumble upon a murdered woman holding a barely alive baby, they feel no small measure of consternation about what to do with the child while launching an investigation into the murder. The denizens of Rockton are a motley crew and certainly not the preferred cross-section of society to be engaged in childcare. Armstrong has created a unique milieu for setting her suspense novels, which is no easy task nowadays. Read one, and you will want to read the rest.

    The Good Killer

    If you’re up for a first-rate page turner, look no further than Harry Dolan’s The Good Killer. Iraq vet Sean and his partner, Molly, have been living under the radar for years, harboring a virtually priceless secret and trying to remain invisible to a pair of dangerous enemies. Then, by sheer unfortunate happenstance, Sean uses his military training to take down a spree killer in a Houston mall. Sean makes a fairly clean getaway, but his face and license plate number are captured by mall security cams, and he becomes something of a reluctant celebrity. Meanwhile, Molly is attending a yoga seminar in Montana, where she is required to surrender her cell phone and renounce all contact with the outside world. Sean has no choice but to drive there and collect her before anyone else can. He heads north in an aging Camry with a faulty alternator, woefully under-armored vis-à-vis the opposing teams. The rest of the book is basically one long and harrowing chase scene, right up to the explosive climax. Block out sufficient time to read The Good Killer in one sitting. It’ll be hard to stop once you get started.

    Copyright 2020 BookPage Reviews.
  • Library Journal Reviews : LJ Reviews 2019 September

    In off-the-grid Rockton, a town deep in the Canadian wilderness where a mix of criminals and victims are hiding from their pasts, Det. Casey Duncan is out camping with her beloved Sheriff Eric Dalton when they discover a grisly scene: a murdered woman buried deep in the snow with a crying baby in her arms. Now the entire town, which doesn't allow in those under 18, must figure out how to care for the babe. Fifth in the popular series.

    Copyright 2019 Library Journal.
  • Publishers Weekly Reviews : PW Reviews 2019 December #4

    Early in bestseller Armstrong's emotionally charged fifth novel set in the Yukon (after 2019's Watcher in the Woods) Det. Casey Duncan and her boyfriend, Sheriff Eric Dalton, are on vacation from their jobs in Rockton—an off-grid sanctuary for those looking to disappear—when they find a woman shot dead in the snow. Clutched to her chest is a newborn, dehydrated but alive. Casey and Dalton bring both to Rockton, where they determine that the victim isn't the child's birth mother. Rockton doesn't allow minors, but its sundry misfits agree to babysit while Casey and Dalton search for answers. Solving the murder should help identify the infant's biological family, but the duo must tread carefully; not all of Rockton's neighbors are good or sane, and the woman might have been warranted in taking the child. The tension rises as Casey and Dalton explore settlements about which Armstrong has previously only hinted, and they confront their own complicated feelings regarding parenthood. Fans of thrillers, small-town mysteries, and classic PI novels will be well pleased. Agent: Helen Heller, Helen Heller Agency (Canada). (Feb.)

    Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

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