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Available copies

  • 20 of 29 copies available at BC Interlibrary Connect. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Prince Rupert Library.

Current holds

2 current holds with 29 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Prince Rupert Library Rice (Text) 33294002093771 Adult Fiction - Second Floor Volume hold Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781770414006
  • ISBN: 1770414002
  • Physical Description: print
    218 pages ; 22 cm
  • Publisher: Toronto, ON : ECW Press, [2018]

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.: "A daring post-apocalyptic novel from a powerful rising literary voice. With winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community goes dark. Cut off, people become passive and confused. Panic builds as the food supply dwindles. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives, escaping the crumbling society to the south. Soon after, others follow. The community leadearship loses its grip on power as the visitors manipulate the tired and hungry to take control of the reserve. Tensions rise and, as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and Anishinaabe tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again. Guided through the chaos by an unlikely leader named Evan Whitesky, they endeavor to restore order while grappling with a grave decision. Blending action and allegory, Moon of the Crusted Snow upends our expectations. Out of catastrophe comes resilience. And as one society collapses, another is reborn."--Provided by publisher.
Subject: City and town life -- Fiction
Interpersonal relations -- Fiction
End of the world -- Fiction
Indigenous peoples -- Canada -- Fiction
Genre/Form: Dystopian fiction.
Domestic fiction.
Thrillers (Fiction)
Topic Heading: First Nation Communities Read 2019-2020
First Nations Canada.
Indigenous.
Aboriginal.

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2018 August #1
    Power outages are a normal occurrence on the reservation of an Anishinaabe community in northern Ontario, but an unusually extended lack of outside communications or food deliveries causes fear and panic among the residents. Evan Whitesky, a young husband and father, helps fortify the town for the looming winter by looking to the old ways of their tribe: hunting, communal support, and offerings to the spirits. Rice's sophomore effort (after Legacy, 2014) is an atmospheric drama that includes some standard apocalyptic tropes—like the loss of contact and the threat of outsiders—but it's the cohesion of community among this indigenous culture and the positive influences of family and tradition that shine in the story. Rice seamlessly injects Anishinaabe ?language into the dialogue and creates a beautiful rendering of the natural world. Although more deliberate than most end-of-the-world thrillers, the story builds in tension and violence as the days get colder and the supplies dwindle. This title will appeal to fans of literary science fiction akin to Cormac McCarthy as well as to readers looking for a fresh voice in indigenous fiction. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.
  • ForeWord Magazine Reviews : ForeWord Magazine Reviews 2018 - November/December

    Moon of the Crusted Snow is an isolated dystopia—a picture of what the end of the world might look like if you only ever lived at the edge of the world to begin with.

    When the power goes out in a northern Anishinaabe community, its tribal leaders aren't initially worried. Most of the connected conveniences are newer to them, anyway. But then the power stays off. A food delivery from the south does not turn up. And whether they let those around them see it or not, Evan and the other community leaders begin to plan for the worst.

    Then an outsider, Justin Scott, arrives, towing an arsenal and a personal supply of booze. He announces chaos in the south and begs to stay, but chaos trails him anyway. His influence poisons community relations, and Evan—with his partner, Nicole, and their two young children—faces the possibility that the Anishinaabe won't make it through the winter intact. Young girls turn up dead in the snow; suicides follow. And Scott has something dark and inarticulable planned, not to mention aspirations to an unearned leadership role.

    The text is somber and controlled as it builds toward its ultimate revelation. Evan progresses, at home and in his community, with outward calm, but it's all a wary calculation. When the outside world fades away here, it's no more violent than other past challenges to the community: there's hunger, there's desperation, and there's death, but its all familiar. The Anishinaabe will persist.

    Hints of an anti-colonialist allegory emerge with Scott's appearance, but they aren't the priority: survival is, as well as maintaining community traditions and knowledge that has faced, and survived, existential threats before. Moon of the Crusted Snow is an uncommon dystopia, both wistful and tough, in which there's nothing all that new about the end of everything.

    © 2018 Foreword Magazine, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  • PW Annex Reviews : Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

    Fall is just about to turn into winter when cell service goes out in a Anishinaabe community in Rice's chilling post-apocalyptic novel (following Legacy). The novel centers on Evan Whitesky, a young father to two children living on a reservation in northern Canada who is attempting to relearn and maintain the traditional ways in a world where society has collapsed and electricity, cell phones, land lines, and satellites have all disappeared. In the absence of all the things that make the long, harsh winters of northern Canada easier, the community has to band together to ensure its survival, doling out canned provisions and trying to ensure running water and heat for everyone for as long as possible. When a man arrives seeking refuge from the chaos in the south, Evan and his community allow him to stay in spite of their misgivings. As the winter progresses and hunger sets in, hostility rises and small-town power struggles become a life-or-death affair. This slow-burning thriller is also a powerful story of survival and will leave readers breathless. (Oct.)

    Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly Annex.
  • PW Annex Reviews : Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

    Fall is just about to turn into winter when cell service goes out in a Anishinaabe community in Rice's chilling post-apocalyptic novel (following Legacy). The novel centers on Evan Whitesky, a young father to two children living on a reservation in northern Canada who is attempting to relearn and maintain the traditional ways in a world where society has collapsed and electricity, cell phones, land lines, and satellites have all disappeared. In the absence of all the things that make the long, harsh winters of northern Canada easier, the community has to band together to ensure its survival, doling out canned provisions and trying to ensure running water and heat for everyone for as long as possible. When a man arrives seeking refuge from the chaos in the south, Evan and his community allow him to stay in spite of their misgivings. As the winter progresses and hunger sets in, hostility rises and small-town power struggles become a life-or-death affair. This slow-burning thriller is also a powerful story of survival and will leave readers breathless. (Oct.)

    Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly Annex.
  • PW Annex Reviews : Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

    Fall is just about to turn into winter when cell service goes out in a Anishinaabe community in Rice's chilling post-apocalyptic novel (following Legacy). The novel centers on Evan Whitesky, a young father to two children living on a reservation in northern Canada who is attempting to relearn and maintain the traditional ways in a world where society has collapsed and electricity, cell phones, land lines, and satellites have all disappeared. In the absence of all the things that make the long, harsh winters of northern Canada easier, the community has to band together to ensure its survival, doling out canned provisions and trying to ensure running water and heat for everyone for as long as possible. When a man arrives seeking refuge from the chaos in the south, Evan and his community allow him to stay in spite of their misgivings. As the winter progresses and hunger sets in, hostility rises and small-town power struggles become a life-or-death affair. This slow-burning thriller is also a powerful story of survival and will leave readers breathless. (Oct.)

    Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly Annex.

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