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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Prince Rupert Library J 595.799 Wilc (Text) 33294001968007 Juvenile Non-Fiction Volume hold Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781459809604
  • Physical Description: print
    regular print
    48 pages : colour illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Publisher: Victoria, British Columbia : Orca Book Publishers, 2015.

Content descriptions

General Note: CatMonthString:february.16
Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Subject: Bees -- Juvenile literature
Curriculum Lab.
Topic Heading: Red Cedar non-fiction nominee 2016/2017

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2015 August #1
    Written by an experienced apiculturist, this book is an introduction to the basics of bee physiology and behavior, dispelling many common myths of this ubiquitous insect. Wilcox celebrates the incredible diversity of bee species and the products that they provide. The life cycle of honeybees and the roles that workers, drones, and queens play is part of a discussion about what beekeepers do to keep colonies healthy. This introductory information provides the basis for a description of the problems facing bee populations that are decreasing at an alarming rate. Though not pointed to as a singular cause, Wilcox emphasizes the tenuous relationship between organisms in an ecosystem and the challenges that industrial agriculture present to maintaining the environment, and in particular, she focuses on bees' special role as pollinators for the world's food supply. This eye-opening book is a call to action, encouraging kids to plant flower gardens, support local farms, and raise awareness of the mysterious plight of disappearing bees. Full-color close-up photos and helpful diagrams add plenty of visual appeal. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.
  • Horn Book Guide Reviews : Horn Book Guide Reviews 2016 Spring
    Beginning with bee characteristics and habits, this book goes on to explain what beekeepers do and what is threatening both honey and wild bees, such as habitat loss, use of neonicotinoid pesticides and herbicides, and parasites and diseases. Plenty of "Bee Fact" sidebars and photos of bees, their keepers, and kids will maintain interest. Reading list, websites. Glos., ind.
  • Kirkus Reviews : Kirkus Reviews 2015 July #2
    Author and hobbyist beekeeper Wilcox presents a cheery introduction to honeybees and their wild cousins. Wilcox covers a lot of territory in a brief book, notably including quite a lot of information about bumblebees and other undomesticated bees as well as a healthy helping of facts about honeybees. From an overview that distinguishes between bees and wasps and then among types of bees and a bit of honeybee history, Wilcox moves on to bees as pollinators, both those used in commercial agriculture and specialist bees that focus on just certain types of blossoms, such as the squash bee. She covers bee behavior and roles, swarming, and what beekeepers do before moving on to cover threats to bees such as neonicotinoids and the varroa mite. The text is broken into brief chapters, which are then broken into short sections, and the design includes both bright, mostly stock photographs and sidebars. Specialized vocabulary ("nectar," "industrial agriculture," etc.) is italicized with in the text and defined in a closing glossary. The resource list includes only two books, both aimed at adults, but the list of websites includes several that are kid-friendly. Wilcox's tone is upbeat, and though her use of the exclamation mark is perhaps overdone, her enthusiasm for her subject is both genuine and infectious. As comprehensive an introduction as can be found in 48 pages. (index) (Nonfiction. 8-12) Copyright Kirkus 2015 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.
  • School Library Connection : School Library Connection Reviews 2016 February

    Keeping bees in flight is thoroughly explained in this well-written book about the life and times of bees. In each of the four chapters, the author examines how the 20,000 known species of bees live, survive, and keep fruits and plants growing. Not only are real-life pictures used to describe bees at work and play, this book gives bee facts and testimonials of bee encounters. Bee enthusiasts will find this book to be an easy, quick read. The photographs and illustrations are timely and vibrant. Children will discover new and old facts that will help them keep bees in flight.

    - Grades 2-4 - Shiela Martina Keaise - Recommended
  • School Library Journal Reviews : SLJ Reviews 2015 July

    Gr 4–6—"There's more to bees than honey," to quote the back cover of this thorough and fascinating look at these insects. It includes side trips into the greater world of why bees matter to world and local ecologies. Why might whole hives be dying? Why do we need bees? Why do fish need bees? How do bees differ from wasps? Do all bees make honey in hives? How can we help bees become healthy again? What are neonicotinoids? Wilcox, who describes her own foray into beekeeping in the introduction, raises and answers these and many more questions in easy prose. Great photos of kids, bees, and hives enhance the text. VERDICT A useful option for science teachers and students curious about bees and ecology.—Dorcas Hand, Annunciation Orthodox School, Houston, TX

    [Page 111]. (c) Copyright 2015 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
  • School Library Journal Reviews : SLJ Reviews 2015 August

    Gr 4–6—"There's more to bees than honey," to quote the back cover of this thorough and fascinating look at these insects. It includes side trips into the greater world of why bees matter to world and local ecologies. Why might whole hives be dying? Why do we need bees? Why do fish need bees? How do bees differ from wasps? Do all bees make honey in hives? How can we help bees become healthy again? What are neonicotinoids? Wilcox, who describes her own foray into beekeeping in the introduction, raises and answers these and many more questions in easy prose. Great photos of kids, bees, and hives enhance the text. VERDICT A useful option for science teachers and students curious about bees and ecology.—Dorcas Hand, Annunciation Orthodox School, Houston, TX

    [Page 111]. (c) Copyright 2015 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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