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It could happen here : America on the brink / ... Read More

Judson, Bruce.(Author).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at BC Interlibrary Connect.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Prince Rupert Library. (Show)

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0 current holds with 1 total copy.

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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Prince Rupert Library 339.20973 Juds (Text) 33294001712850 Adult Non-Fiction Volume hold Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780061689109
  • Physical Description: xii, 228 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Edition: 1st ed.
  • Publisher: New York : Harper, c2009.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
Freedom from want -- Immunity from history? -- The ... Read More
Subject: Distributive justice > United States.
Income distribution > United States.
Wealth > United States.
Revolutions > Economic aspects > United States.

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2009 October #2
    Judson believes "economic inequality is the single greatest predictor of revolution, and inequality in America has reached catastrophic levels." He urges the Obama administration to raise the relative prosperity of the middle class in order to avoid frustration and unrest. Unemployment is the worst since the Great Depression, and foreclosure or near-foreclosure status affects one in nine homes, 47 million Americans have no health insurance, many families with two wage earners cannot meet basic needs, and the retirement savings of many individuals have been lost. The author explains that inequality in the U.S. has developed over the past 30 years and suggests policy changes and goals, including restoring trust in government, finance, and business; instituting greater economic security for low- and middle-income households; and reining in some of the excesses that evolved from free-market abuses. All readers will not agree with Judson, but his book will excite argument and discussion, serving as an excellent springboard for considering these important, timely issues. Copyright 2009 Booklist Reviews.

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